Health Information Technology: One of the Fastest Growing Career Options

When patients see a health care provider such as physician, dentist, chiropractor, or nurse practitioner, a written document is filed detailing the purpose and outcomes.

This documentation is placed in the patient’s chart and is available for the practitioner to review at the next visit. This provides for continuity of care in the event that another health professional in that office sees the patient as well as refreshes the same practitioner’s memory about the care he/she has provided for the patient.

Results from laboratory tests, X-rays, other diagnostic tests as well as a list of medications or treatments prescribed are also contained in the chart. In addition to this information, the chart will also contain any paperwork the patient completes, such as a family medical history, insurance information and consents for treatment, authorization to share information, and so on.

New Office New Chart

If the patient sees another health care provider, such as a specialist recommended by the primary care practitioner, a new chart is created and most often there is no integration of the information with the other physician’s chart. If the patient is hospitalized, another chart is created. Each health professional creates a new chart or file for the patient and often has to reinvent the wheel to get a complete picture of the patient’s health history.

If the patient obtains medications from several different pharmacies, there is not a complete profile available at any of them. This sometimes results in medication errors from issues such as duplication of medications, or unknown medication interactions.

Oversight Not a Reality

Patients who have primary care providers who are willing and able to oversee the total care of a patient will have records sent from all sources of care each time they see another provider and review them. This is cumbersome, time consuming, and not reimbursable. In reality it does not happen often.

Most patients are not versed in medical terminology. Often they barely understand a diagnosis or treatment. Some things may seem totally insignificant and are forgotten, such as a visit to the Urgent Care for a virus or to the ER for a sprained ankle, and the information doesn’t get passed on to the primary care professional. A complication that could stem back to this illness or injury may never be connected.

Quality Improvement

In the interest of improving medical care, the establishment of electronic medical records (EMR) has become a hot issue and part of the health care reform debate. In order to create and maintain effective records, there has to be standardization procedures. Codes need to be applied to diagnoses and other information so that the records can be meshed.

The software in the physician’s office has to be able to communicate with the software the dentist uses, the eye doctor uses, the surgeon uses, the oncologist uses and the cardiologist uses or it is useless. It also has to be secure so that the patient’s information isn’t accidentally broadcast to those who have no need to know.

Health IT Growing Rapidly

This has opened up and broadened the scope of information technology in the health field. Health care IT (HIT) is one of the most rapidly growing career fields. HIT offers many diverse opportunities from medical records coding and management in a small medical office to a huge hospital or medical corporation.

Another opportunity involves data collection and management of diseases such as for tumor registries. Teaching physicians and other health care professionals how to use their system to record and retrieve data is a related option, as is maintenance of the hardware and software systems.

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How to Bank Umbilical Cord Blood: Steps to Take to Ensure Safe Storage

Parents of newborns can choose to store the umbilical cord blood of the newborn for possible future medical use for the child.

The stem cells from umbilical cord blood can be used to treat a variety of genetic and blood related disorders. The umbilical cord blood is full of stem cells that are capable of reproducing healthy components of the blood.

Talk to the Doctor about Medical History and Cord Blood Banks

Choosing to bank your infant’s umbilical cord blood is a personal decision that requires research into the medical history of both families as well as the available storage options. Parents should consult the obstetrician to discuss medical history that could indicate a future need for the stem cells found in cord blood and get recommendations about private cord blood banking services. If the obstetrician is unfamiliar with cord blood banking, ask for a referral to another physician for discussion or consider contacting your child’s pediatrician for guidance. The obstetrician as well as the hospital will need to be aware of the decision to bank the umbilical cord blood in order for proper collection procedures to be followed after the delivery.

Research Umbilical Cord Banks

There are a number of both private and public banks that provide storage of umbilical cord blood. If the decision has been made to reserve the infant’s umbilical cord blood for possible future use for that child, private cord blood banks should be explored. Private cord blood banks charge collection fees as well as annual storage fees. If the decision is made to donate the umbilical cord blood, a public umbilical cord blood bank should be contacted. This option is available free of charge. Both services will provide a collection packet that should be taken to the hospital on the day of delivery.

When researching umbilical cord banks, it is important to do business with a reputable business that has a stable financial history. Check with the Better Business Bureau for any past complaints that could indicate an issue with the agency. The blood bank should provide a contract that will spell out all terms associated with the storage of the umbilical cord blood. Be sure the contract details what happens to the stored cord blood if the bank should go out of business. In addition, ensure that all fees are clearly spelled out so there will be no surprises once the umbilical cord blood has been stored.

Prepare for Collection of Umbilical Cord Blood

Once an umbilical cord blood banking service has been chosen, the agency should provide a collection kit. Take this kit to the hospital when admitted for the delivery of the baby. Inform all medical staff, including the obstetrician and nurses, of the decision to bank the baby’s umbilical cord blood. After collection is complete, the umbilical cord blood can be securely shipped to the agency to be preserved for storage. Current research shows that umbilical cord blood is suitable for use for 15 years after storage. While the blood may be viable after this point, there is not research to support this theory.

The decision to bank the umbilical cord blood should be made early in the third trimester. It is important to make the decision as early as possible to ensure the collection kit is received before the arrival of the baby.

What are the Differences Between Colds and Flu? Symptoms of the Common Cold and the Influenza Virus

Colds and flu are contagious viruses that are transmitted from person to person. Symptoms of the common cold and influenza are similar, but flu symptoms are more severe.

The terms ‘cold’ and ‘flu’ are often used interchangeably, but they are different illnesses resulting from different viruses. A virus which leads to a cold will cause a person to feel unwell, but still able to get on with most day-to-day activities. The flu virus is more debilitating than the common cold, and genuine flu sufferers will find it difficult to do anything except lie down and rest.

What are Colds and Flu?

Once a cold or flu virus enters the body, it attacks the body’s cells and reproduces rapidly, spreading in just a few hours. Cold and flu viruses affect the upper respiratory tract (nose, throat, sinuses, trachea, larynx and bronchial tubes), and symptoms of colds and flu are caused by the immune system’s reaction to the invasion of such viruses.

Colds and flu are self-limiting infections, meaning that they go away on their own. Taking lots of rest, drinking plenty of fluids and using over-the-counter medications such as ibuprofen and cough remedies, usually manage the symptoms of colds and flu.

Symptoms of the Common Cold

The common cold is so called simply because it is a very common infection among humans, with adults and children usually suffering from several colds each year. It is thought that more than 200 different cold viruses are responsible for causing colds. Symptoms of colds include:

  • Sneezing
  • Runny nose
  • Sore throat
  • Hoarseness
  • Coughing
  • Headaches
  • Blocked nose
  • Blocked ears
  • Earache
  • Tiredness
  • Mild temperature
  • Feeling shivery

Symptoms of a cold will usually develop within one to two days of contracting the virus, and will be at their worst within three days. After that, symptoms will begin to ease, and will take a week or two to completely disappear.

Symptoms of the Flu Virus

Contrary to popular belief, the flu is not the same as a very bad cold. Flu is caused by three different influenza viruses of which there are different strains. Flu symptoms are similar to cold symptoms, but are more severe and appear more quickly. Other symptoms of flu include:

  • Notably higher fever
  • Sweating
  • Exhaustion
  • Aching muscles
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

Flu symptoms usually appear within a few hours of a person coming into contact with the flu virus. As with a cold, flu sufferers will usually start to feel better within a week, but tiredness may linger for some time.

Some people are at risk of serious secondary infections such as acute bronchitis and pneumonia if they contract the flu virus, and a flu vaccination may be recommended. At risk groups include people aged over 65, and those with:

  • Diabetes
  • A weakened immune system
  • Asthma
  • Kidney or liver disease
  • Cardiovascular disease

The common cold and the flu are caused by different viruses, with symptoms of the flu presenting more quickly and with more severity than those of a cold. However, as both illnesses share many of the same symptoms, distinguishing between a severe cold and the flu can sometimes be difficult.

Spanish Flu Different from Swine Flu Pandemic: Experts Suggest H1N1 Flu Virus No Cause for Panic

Many reporters and scientist cite the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918 when discussing the H1N1 virus (Swine Flu). Yet key differences exist between the two pandemics.

Whenever talk of an influenza pandemic arises, invariably the 1918 Spanish Flu outbreak is mentioned. The current H1N1 flu pandemic or Swine Flu virus is actually a strain or offshoot of the 1918 Spanish Flu virus, which increases the concern among health care workers about the virus’ ability to spread, infect, and kill people. Swine flu or H1N1 is a mix of four viral strains into a new, unique type. Yet there are critical differences between the 1918 outbreak and the 2009 outbreak.

The 1918 Spanish Flu Epidemic

The 1918 Spanish Flu epidemic killed approximately 100 million people worldwide. It lasted from March 1918 to June 1920. Unlike other influenza epidemics, this particular strain caused 10-20% mortality as compared to less than .1% mortality and appeared to kill healthy young adults more so than infants and the elderly, the typical victims of flu. Researchers estimate that one third of the entire world’s population contracted Spanish Flu.

Critical Differences Between H1N1 and the 1918 Spanish Flu Outbreak

Scientists have long feared a second influenza pandemic. The last significant pandemic was the 1968 Hong Kong flu. Many critical differences between the 1918 outbreak and the H1N1 strain should put people’s fears to rest.

According to one of the biology reference sites, these differences include the following:

  • Spanish Flu was so deadly because it caused a cytokine storm. A cytokine storm is when the virus hijacks the body’s immune system and overwhelms it, thus negating the body’s natural defense.
  • Spanish Flu targeted the young and healthy. The Swine flu virus affects a mixed group of people.
  • Secondary infections such as bacterial pneumonia accounted for a huge number of deaths from Spanish Flu. Today, antibiotics combat bacteria pneumonia. Antibiotic medications did not exist in 1918.
  • Antiviral medications such as Tamiflu can be used to shorten the severity and duration of Swine Flu. These medications did not exist in 1918.
  • Breathing difficulties due to congestion and bleeding in the lungs also caused deaths from the Spanish Flu. Today, medical equipment such as ventilators (breathing machines) can assist breathing in severely ill patients.

World War I and Its Effects Upon the Spread of Spanish Flu

Another important consideration is the effects of World War I on the spread of the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic. During times of war, several factors coalesce to create the “perfect storm” for a pandemic.

  • Men are housed in close quarters such as barracks, creating an ideal environment for infection to spread.
  • Medical supplies during World War I may have been harder to obtain, with many supplies going to the war effort. What was available was primitive compared with modern medications and treatments.
  • Food shortages, rationing and poor quality food weakened the population of countries at war.

The only factor affecting today’s Swine flu outbreak is when people live in close quarters. Outbreaks of Swine flu reported in September 2009 on college campuses, especially in dormitories. But most Swine flu victims are ill for only about three days before feeling better. If complications arise, they can be treated in the hospital.

H1N1 Flu Pandemic No Cause for Panic

Dr. Jorge Parada, associate professor of medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine says that H1N1 is no cause for panic. “It was the pre-antibiotic age. If you had post-influenza pneumonia, the likelihood of doing poorly and dying were much higher,” Parada said. “We’re in the antibiotic age now and we do a much better job of treating and preventing post-influenza pneumonia.”

Parada also points out that antiviral medications such as Tamiflu and Relenza, if used in the early stages of infection, shorten the severity and duration.

“The earlier treatment is started, the more effective it is,” Parada said. “If treatment is started after 72 hours of symptoms, it has very limited effect. It has a greater effect if it’s started after 48 hours and an even better effect if it’s started within 24 hours of symptoms.”

Other weapons to fight H1N1 include flu vaccines and simple hygienic practices such as frequent hand washing or using hand sanitizers, staying at home if feeling ill, and avoiding crowds during known outbreaks. For those who do not wish to receive a flu vaccine, following natural and alternative methods to boost immune system response, such as avoiding sugar and increasing intake of fruits, vegetables and healthy foods, using herbs and homeopathic remedies might help.

Parada and other scientists caution that while H1N1flu pandemic is no laughing matter, it’s not time to panic yet. The world is a long way from the millions of deaths experienced during the 1918 pandemic. Hopefully, H1N1 will be a typical influenza virus and will disappear as quickly as it appeared.

Morgellons Disease – A Rare Medical Condition: Learn the Symptoms and Treatment

A rare new medical condition is currently under study investigations by the CDC because of the many unusual symptoms it has shown to produce.

The CDC has begun study investigation on a rare new medical condition that produces many unusual symptoms. This rare condition is called Morgellons Disease. There have been many reported cases of this disease where the patients report to experience moving fibers growing from within skin lesions on the body. These rare symptoms often lead doctors to improperly diagnose a patient with a psychiatric disorder instead of an actual medical condition.

The CDC began their investigation after the numbers of reported cases of Morgellons Disease began to rise. This disease has become so wide spread that all 50 states of the United States now report cases of Morgellons Disease. Florida and Texas have reported the most cases. Canada, the United Kingdom, and Australia have began reporting similar cases of Morgellons Disease. The only evidence that has come for the studies is the conclusion that the patients family members are likely to be affected by the condition as well.

Symptoms

Morgellons Disease produces very rare and very odd symptoms. These symptoms are so unique that patients are often disregarded as having a psychiatric condition. A common symptom of this condition is painful skin lesions that cause an intense and painful itching. Inside the skin lesions, patients report seeing white, blue, red, and black moving fibers. There have been many reports of odd sensations underneath the skin as if bugs were crawling in their skin or insects have been stinging them. Extreme fatigue has been associated with this disease as well as lack of concentration. Some patients have experienced vision disturbances and memory loss. The joints and muscles of the bodies can become painful. Behavioral changes and gastrointestinal disturbances have been reported. The skin on the body can begin to change texture and even color.

Treatment

Since Morgellons Disease is a relatively new condition, there is no known cure. So little is known about this condition that it is not even known if it is infectious. The cause of this rare disease remains unknown as well. Doctors can only recommend treatments to cope with this condition. The most important step for a patient to follow is to get frequent check ups by a trusting and understanding doctor. Alternative treatments may benefit the treatment of this disease so it is important to keep an open mind. Conventional medications have not shown to have any positive impact of treating Morgellons Disease.

Achondroplasia: A Form of Dwarfism

Acondroplasia is a rare genetic disorder characterized by short stature.

Acondroplasia features include disproportionate stature. This basically means that the arms and legs are relatively small when compared to the torso (body). The size disadvantage acondroplasia patients have is more observable in the upper legs and arms (proximal).

Additional signs include a prominent forehead (frontal bone), a prominent jaw, and a flat or depressed region between the eyes. On occasion, there is overcrowding of teeth, and the upper and lower dentition have bad alignment. The disease occurs in all races with equal incidence in women and men. Achondroplasia attacks one in 25,000 to one in 40,000 people.

The lower extremities of a patient with achondroplasia almost always turns bowed, and occasionally the elbow joint can’t be straightened out completely. The arms are short and stumpy and the feet can be small, flat and wide.

Causes of Achondroplasia

A chemical modification within a single gene results in achondroplasia. It does not arise from anything the parents have practiced during or prior to childbirth. Achondroplasia starts from an autosomal dominate condition. What this means is a new chromosomal mutation or genetic alteration began to take place at the time of conception.

The disease may also be communicated from one generation to the next; 9 out of 10 babies born with this illness have average-sized mothers and fathers. If one adult has the disease, there is a fifty percent probability their baby will inherit a copy of the gene. If the mother and father both have the disease there is a twenty-five percent chance the baby will have a dominant gene factor and a seventy-five percent possibility of a single achondroplasia gene. This gene is referred to as FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor).

Other Illnesses Related to Achondroplasia

Babies with this disease have an inclination towards middle-ear infections. This may occur until 5 or 6 years of life, and it may be owing to abnormal draining from the “pipe” that leads from the middle part of the ear to the throat (pharynx). Respiratory troubles can happen in babies and children, due to constricted nasal openings.

An individual with achondroplasia will have the same life expectancy as an individual without the disease. Hydrocephalus (water in the central nervous system) can also occur in certain instances of achondroplasia.

Kids with achondroplasia may successfully reach motor milestones of growth, but differently and more gradually than youngsters without the disease. For example the baby with achondroplasia might take much longer to sit up than a baby who does not have the disease – but there could always be exceptions.

Pediculosis Explained: Having Critters in Your Hair

If you have children, you probably know that from time to time something occurs that is an all out and complete nightmare. Among these things is head lice or pediculosis.

Kids tend to be the most prone to acquiring pediculosis, particularly when they are still attending elementary school.

The most obvious culprit? Other children! You may observe that grownups very rarely ever contract pediculosis, but kids frequently do. As a matter of fact, it’s probably rare that you know one adult individual that did not get pediculosis as a child or has a kid who has already experienced something of this nature.

The Dangers of Pediculosis

Head pediculosis isn’t life-threatening and they do not spread diseases, but they’re contractible and can be quite bothersome for your youngster. Their stings may cause a youngster’s scalp to turn nail-bitingly excruciating and reddened, and long-term itching may lead to skin irritation and possibly infection!

The majority of parents realize what it’s like to have to experience something with your child and not be capable of dealing with it so when it comes to pediculosis capitis or body pediculosis you might not even find out your kid has it till you genuinely pay attention to a few key signs and symptoms.

There are a few things you can be watching out for in order to ascertain if your child has Pediculosis

Pediculosis eggs (also known as nits) seem like tiny brown, purplish, or yellow dots prior to them hatching. After hatching, the leftover shell looks light yellow or white. Pediculosis is when nits are deposited on hair follicles located at the skin’s surface, where the heat is ideal for keeping the eggs warm until they hatch.

Nits look much like dandruff, but they cannot be terminated by shaking or brushing them off. Unless the problem is utterly serious, it is more commonplace to see nits in a kid’s hair than it is to observe live pediculosis crawling on the scalp. The eggs hatch approximately 7 to 14 days after they are deposited.

Itching and Pediculosis

Scratching is a natural response to itching, but if your youngster is continuously scratching his scalp, it’s a good idea to have a look and see if you are able to notice anything! In addition, if they notify you about “little things” running around and tickling their foreheads this is a very dependable “sign” that they may be carrying pediculosis!

It is recommended that if your child does notify you of scratching or “tickling” you can take a fine-toothed comb and “sweep” his hair from side to side, look at his hair follicles and scalp. If you do discover something, it’s crucial that you call a physician who can recommend a effective shampoo or conditioner for your kid to eliminate the pediculosis. This is unquestionably not something you would like to delay!

These might be nonprescription or prescription drugs, contingent on what treatments have already been administered. Medicated pediculosis treatments normally wipe out the pediculosis and nits, but it could take a few weeks for the itching to cease.

Many people say that pediculosis is like varicella: once they contract it, they will most likely never get it again. This just isn’t the case regrettably!

Be on the lookout for pediculosis on your children and once you do come across its signs, be sure they see a physician right away. No one should accept this for a longer length of time than necessary.